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definición - Drill

drill (n.)

1.(military) the training of soldiers to march (as in ceremonial parades) or to perform the manual of arms

2.systematic training by multiple repetitions"practice makes perfect"

3.similar to the mandrill but smaller and less brightly colored

4.(ellipsis)a tool with a sharp point and cutting edges for making holes in hard materials (usually rotating rapidly or by repeated blows)

drill (v.)

1.train in the military, e.g., in the use of weapons

2.undergo military training or do military exercises

3.learn by repetition"We drilled French verbs every day" "Pianists practice scales"

4.teach by repetition

drill (v. trans.)

1.make a hole, especially with a pointed power or hand tool"don't drill here, there's a gas pipe" "drill a hole into the wall" "drill for oil" "carpenter bees are boring holes into the wall"

Drill (n.)

1.(MeSH)A genus of the subfamily CERCOPITHECINAE, family CERCOPITHECIDAE, comprising two species: the drill (M. leucophaeus) and the mandrill (M. sphinx). They are usually found in thick rainforest and have a gentle disposition despite their ferocious reputation. Some authors consider Mandrillus a subgenus of PAPIO.

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Merriam Webster

DrillDrill (?), v. t. [imp. & p. p. Drilled (?); p. pr. & vb. n. Drilling.] [D. drillen to bore, drill (soldiers); probably akin to AS. pyrlian, pyrelian, to pierce. See Thrill.]
1. To pierce or bore with a drill, or a with a drill; to perforate; as, to drill a hole into a rock; to drill a piece of metal.

2. To train in the military art; to exercise diligently, as soldiers, in military evolutions and exercises; hence, to instruct thoroughly in the rudiments of any art or branch of knowledge; to discipline.

He [Frederic the Great] drilled his people, as he drilled his grenadiers. Macaulay.

DrillDrill, v. i. To practice an exercise or exercises; to train one's self.

DrillDrill, n.
1. An instrument with an edged or pointed end used for making holes in hard substances; strictly, a tool that cuts with its end, by revolving, as in drilling metals, or by a succession of blows, as in drilling stone; also, a drill press.

2. (Mil.) The act or exercise of training soldiers in the military art, as in the manual of arms, in the execution of evolutions, and the like; hence, diligent and strict instruction and exercise in the rudiments and methods of any business; a kind or method of military exercises; as, infantry drill; battalion drill; artillery drill.

3. Any exercise, physical or mental, enforced with regularity and by constant repetition; as, a severe drill in Latin grammar.

4. (Zoöl.) A marine gastropod, of several species, which kills oysters and other bivalves by drilling holes through the shell. The most destructive kind is Urosalpinx cinerea.

Bow drill, Breast drill. See under Bow, Breast. -- Cotter drill, or Traverse drill, a machine tool for drilling slots. -- Diamond drill. See under Diamond. -- Drill jig. See under Jig. -- Drill pin, the pin in a lock which enters the hollow stem of the key. -- Drill sergeant (Mil.), a noncommissioned officer whose office it is to instruct soldiers as to their duties, and to train them to military exercises and evolutions. -- Vertical drill, a drill press.

DrillDrill, v. t. [Cf. Trill to trickle, Trickle, Dribble, and W. rhillio to put in a row, drill.]
1. To cause to flow in drills or rills or by trickling; to drain by trickling; as, waters drilled through a sandy stratum. [R.] Thomson.

2. To sow, as seeds, by dribbling them along a furrow or in a row, like a trickling rill of water.

3. To entice; to allure from step; to decoy; -- with on. [Obs.]

See drilled him on to five-fifty. Addison.

4. To cause to slip or waste away by degrees. [Obs.]

This accident hath drilled away the whole summer. Swift.

DrillDrill, v. i.
1. To trickle. [Obs. or R.] Sandys.

2. To sow in drills.

DrillDrill, n.
1. A small trickling stream; a rill. [Obs.]

Springs through the pleasant meadows pour their drills. Sandys.

2. (Agr.) (a) An implement for making holes for sowing seed, and sometimes so formed as to contain seeds and drop them into the hole made. (b) A light furrow or channel made to put seed into sowing. (c) A row of seed sown in a furrow.

Drill is used adjectively, or as the first part of a compound; as, drill barrow or drill-barrow; drill husbandry; drill plow or drill-plow.

Drill barrow, a wheeled implement for planting seed in drills. -- Drill bow, a small bow used for the purpose of rapidly turning a drill around which the bowstring takes a turn. -- Drill harrow, a harrow used for stirring the ground between rows, or drills. -- Drill plow, or Drill plough, a sort plow for sowing grain in drills.

DrillDrill (?), n. [Cf. Mandrill.] (Zoöl.) A large African baboon (Cynocephalus leucophæus).

DrillDrill, n. [Usually in pl.] (Manuf.) Same as Drilling.

Imperial drill, a linen fabric having two threads in the warp and three in the filling.

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definición (más)

definición de Drill (Wikipedia)

sinónimos - Drill

ver también - Drill

drill (v.)

driller

frases

-2 Minute Drill • 3 cone drill • Battle drill • Beatty Street Drill Hall • Big Drill Car • Bioko Drill • Bow drill • Brain Drill • Cartier Square Drill Hall • Chinese fire drill • Churn drill • Core drill • Dental drill • Diamond core drill bit • Down-The-Hole Drill • Drifter (drill) • Drill (EP) • Drill (UK band) • Drill (agriculture) • Drill (album) • Drill (band) • Drill (disambiguation) • Drill (fabric) • Drill (mammal) • Drill Bit (Transformers) • Drill Call • Drill Dozer • Drill Hall (disambiguation) • Drill Here. Drill Now. • Drill Instructor Ribbon • Drill Purpose Rifle • Drill Sergeant Identification Badge • Drill Sergeant Mindstrong • Drill Stem Test • Drill a Hole in That Substrate and Tell Me What You See • Drill and ceremony • Drill and tap size chart • Drill bit • Drill bit (well) • Drill bit shank • Drill bit sizes • Drill bits • Drill book • Drill commands • Drill cuttings • Drill down • Drill floor • Drill hall • Drill instructor • Drill jig • Drill line • Drill of Death • Drill pipe • Drill string • Drill string compensator • Drill team • Drill tower • Drill, Ye Tarriers, Drill • Drill, baby, drill • Drill, drill, drill • Equestrian drill team • Exhibition drill • Failure drill • Fire drill • Flame jet drill • Foot drill • Gun drill • Hammer drill • Hand drill (hieroglyph) • Impact drill • Khaki drill • Lew Drill • Licensed to Drill • Lincoln Drill Hall • List of fire drill regulations for schools in the United States • Lockdown drill • Lucky Star Moe Drill • Mainland Drill • Mikan Drill • Mounted drill • Mozambique Drill • Mr. Driller Drill Spirits • Muster drill • Oyster drill • Percussion drill • Persian drill • Pit drill • Pneumatic drill • Precision Drill Squad • Revolutionary War Drill Manual • Rock Drill • Rotary hammer drill • Sabre Flight Drill Team • Seed drill • Stand (drill pipe) • Star drill • Swivel (drill rig) • The Drill (album) • The Drill (disambiguation) • The Drill (song) • The Drill Hall • Tip Drill (song) • Tip drill • Tip drill (basketball) • Tornado drill • Tueller Drill • Twist drill • Two-Minute Drill • Two-minute drill • United States Marine Corps Silent Drill Platoon

diccionario analógico





guenon-like monkey[ClasseTaxo.]

zoology[Domaine]

Monkey[Domaine]

drill (n.)








Wikipedia

Drill

                   
  Drill scheme

A drill is a tool fitted with a cutting tool attachment or driving tool attachment, usually a drill bit or driver bit, used for drilling holes in various materials or fastening various materials together with the use of fasteners. The attachment is gripped by a chuck at one end of the drill and rotated while pressed against the target material. The tip, and sometimes edges, of the cutting tool does the work of cutting into the target material. This may be slicing off thin shavings (twist drills or auger bits), grinding off small particles (oil drilling), crushing and removing pieces of the workpiece (SDS masonry drill), countersinking, counterboring, or other operations.

Drills are commonly used in woodworking, metalworking, construction and do-it-yourself projects. Specially designed drills are also used in medicine, space missions and other applications. Drills are available with a wide variety of performance characteristics, such as power and capacity.

Contents

  History

  A wooden drill handle and other carpentry tools found on board the 16th century carrack Mary Rose.

The earliest drills existed some thirty-five thousand years ago. The drills consisted of little more than a pointed rock which would be spun between the hands. [1] The next major development was bow drills which date back to the ancient Harappans and Egyptians. The drill press as a machine tool evolved from the bow drill and is many centuries old. It was powered by various power sources over the centuries, such as human effort, water wheels, and windmills, often with the use of belts. With the coming of the electric motor in the late 19th century, there was a great rush to power machine tools with such motors, and drills were among them. The invention of the first electric drill is credited to Arthur James Arnot and William Blanch Brain,[2] in 1889, at Melbourne, Australia. Wilhelm Fein[3] invented the portable electric drill in 1895, at Stuttgart, Germany. In 1917, Black & Decker patented a trigger-like switch mounted on a pistol-grip handle.[4]

  Types

  Inside an electric drill

There are many types of drills: some are powered manually, others use electricity (electric drill) or compressed air (pneumatic drill) as the motive power, and a minority are driven by an internal combustion engine (for example, earth drilling augers). Drills with a percussive action (hammer drills) are mostly used in hard materials such as masonry (brick, concrete and stone) or rock. Drilling rigs are used to bore holes in the earth to obtain water or oil. Oil wells, water wells, or holes for geothermal heating are created with large drilling rigs. Some types of hand-held drills are also used to drive screws and other fasteners. Some small appliances that have no motor of their own may be drill-powered, such as small pumps, grinders, etc.

  Carpenter using a crank-powered brace to drill a hole

  Hand tools

A variety of hand-powered drills have been employed over the centuries. Here are a few, starting with approximately the oldest:

  An old hand drill or "eggbeater" drill. The hollow wooden handle, with screw-on cap, is used to store drill bits

  Pistol-grip (corded) drill

  Anatomy of a pistol-grip corded drill.

Drills with pistol grips are the most common type in use today, and are available in a huge variety of subtypes. A less common type is the right-angle drill, a special tool used by tradesmen such as plumbers and electricians.

For much of the 20th century, many attachments could commonly be purchased to convert corded electric hand drills into a range of other power tools, such as orbital sanders and power saws, more cheaply than purchasing conventional, self-contained versions of those tools (the greatest saving being the lack of an additional electric motor for each device). As the prices of power tools and suitable electric motors have fallen, however, such attachments have become much less common. A similar practice is currently employed for cordless tools where the battery, the most expensive component, is shared between various motorised devices, as opposed to a single electric motor being shared between mechanical attachments.

  Drills can also be used at an angle to join two boards.

  Hammer drill

The hammer drill is similar to a standard electric drill, with the exception that it is provided with a hammer action for drilling masonry. The hammer action may be engaged or disengaged as required. Most electric hammer drills are rated (input power) at between 600 and 1100 watts. The efficiency is usually 50-60% i.e. 1000 watts of input is converted into 500-600 watts of output (rotation of the drill and hammering action).

The hammer action is provided by two cam plates that make the chuck rapidly pulse forward and backward as the drill spins on its axis. This pulsing (hammering) action is measured in Blows Per Minute (BPM) with 10,000 or more BPMs being common. Because the combined mass of the chuck and bit is comparable to that of the body of the drill, the energy transfer is inefficient and can sometimes make it difficult for larger bits to penetrate harder materials such as poured concrete. The operator experiences considerable vibration, and the cams are generally made from hardened steel to avoid them wearing out quickly. In practice, drills are restricted to standard masonry bits up to 13 mm (1/2 inch) in diameter. A typical application for a hammer drill is installing electrical boxes, conduit straps or shelves in concrete.

In contrast to the cam-type hammer drill, a rotary/pneumatic hammer drill accelerates only the bit. This is accomplished through a piston design, rather than a spinning cam. Rotary hammers have much less vibration and penetrate most building materials. They can also be used as "drill only" or as "hammer only" which extends their usefulness for tasks such as chipping brick or concrete. Hole drilling progress is greatly superior to cam-type hammer drills, and these drills are generally used for holes of 19 mm (3/4 inch) or greater in size. A typical application for a rotary hammer drill is boring large holes for lag bolts in foundations, or installing large lead anchors in concrete for handrails or benches.

A standard hammer drill accepts 6 mm (1/4 inch) and 13 mm (1/2 inch) drill bits, while a rotary hammer uses SDS or Spline Shank bits. These heavy bits are adept at pulverising the masonry and drill into this hard material with relative ease.

However, there is a big difference in cost. In the UK a cam hammer typically costs £12 or more, while a rotary/pneumatic costs £35 or more. In the US a typical hammer drill costs between $70 and $120, and a rotary hammer between $150 and $500 (depending on bit size). For DIY use or to drill holes less than 13 mm (1/2 inch) in size, the hammer drill is most commonly used.

  Rotary hammer drill

  A rotary hammer drill used in construction

The rotary hammer drill (also known as a rotary hammer, roto hammer drill or masonry drill) combines a primary dedicated hammer mechanism with a separate rotation mechanism, and is used for more substantial material such as masonry or concrete. Generally, standard chucks and drills are inadequate and chucks such as SDS and carbide drills that have been designed to withstand the percussive forces are used. Some styles of this tool are intended for masonry drilling only and the hammer action cannot be disengaged. Other styles allow the drill to be used without the hammer action for normal drilling, or hammering to be used without rotation for chiselling.

  Cordless drills

  Cordless drill

A cordless drill is an electric drill which uses rechargeable batteries. These drills are available with similar features to an AC mains-powered drill. They are available in the hammer drill configuration and most have a clutch, which aids in driving screws into various substrates while not damaging them. Also available are right angle drills, which allow a worker to drive screws in a tight space. While 21st century battery innovations allow significantly more drilling, large diameter holes (typically 12–25 mm (0.5–1.0 in) or larger) may drain current cordless drills quickly.

For continuous use, a worker will have one or more spare battery packs charging while drilling, and quickly swap them instead of having to wait an hour or more for recharging, although there are now Rapid Charge Batteries that can charge in 10–15 minutes.

Early cordless drills used interchangeable 7.2 V battery packs. Over the years battery voltages have increased, with 18 V drills being most common, but higher voltages are available, such as 24 V, 28 V, and 36 V. This allows these tools to produce as much torque as some corded drills.

Common battery types of are nickel-cadmium (NiCd) batteries and lithium-ion batteries, with each holding about half the market share. NiCd batteries have been around longer, so they are less expensive (their main advantage), but have more disadvantages compared to lithium-ion batteries. NiCd disadvantages are limited life, self-discharging, environment problems upon disposal, and eventually internally short circuiting due to dendrite growth. Lithium-ion batteries are becoming more common because of their short charging time, longer life, absence of memory effect, and low weight. Instead of charging a tool for an hour to get 20 minutes of use, 20 minutes of charge can run the tool for an hour. Lithium-ion batteries also have a constant discharge rate. The power output remains constant until the battery is depleted, something that nickel-cadmium batteries also lack, and which makes the tool much more versatile. Lithium-ion batteries also hold a charge for a significantly longer time than nickel-cadmium batteries, about two years if not used, vs. 1 to 4 months for a nickel-cadmium battery.

  Drill press

  A drill press

A drill press (also known as pedestal drill, pillar drill, or bench drill) is a fixed style of drill that may be mounted on a stand or bolted to the floor or workbench. Portable models with a magnetic base grip the steel workpieces they drill. A drill press consists of a base, column (or pillar), table, spindle (or quill), and drill head, usually driven by an induction motor. The head has a set of handles (usually 3) radiating from a central hub that, when turned, move the spindle and chuck vertically, parallel to the axis of the column. The table can be adjusted vertically and is generally moved by a rack and pinion; however, some older models rely on the operator to lift and reclamp the table in position. The table may also be offset from the spindle's axis and in some cases rotated to a position perpendicular to the column. The size of a drill press is typically measured in terms of swing. Swing is defined as twice the throat distance, which is the distance from the center of the spindle to the closest edge of the pillar. For example, a 16-inch (410 mm) drill press has an 8-inch (200 mm) throat distance.

  Old industrial drill press designed to be driven from the power source by a flat belt

A drill press has a number of advantages over a hand-held drill:

  • Less effort is required to apply the drill to the workpiece. The movement of the chuck and spindle is by a lever working on a rack and pinion, which gives the operator considerable mechanical advantage
  • The table allows a vise or clamp to be used to position and restrain the work, making the operation much more secure
  • The angle of the spindle is fixed relative to the table, allowing holes to be drilled accurately and consistently
  • Drill presses are almost always equipped with more powerful motors compared to hand-held drills. This enables larger drill bits to be used and also speeds up drilling with smaller bits.

For most drill presses—especially those meant for woodworking or home use—speed change is achieved by manually moving a belt across a stepped pulley arrangement. Some drill presses add a third stepped pulley to increase the number of available speeds. Modern drill presses can, however, use a variable-speed motor in conjunction with the stepped-pulley system. Medium-duty drill presses such as those used in machine shop (tool room) applications are equipped with a continuously variable transmission. This mechanism is based on variable-diameter pulleys driving a wide, heavy-duty belt. This gives a wide speed range as well as the ability to change speed while the machine is running. Heavy-duty drill presses used for metalworking are usually of the gear-head type described below.

Drill presses are often used for miscellaneous workshop tasks other than drilling holes. This includes sanding, honing, and polishing. These tasks can be performed by mounting sanding drums, honing wheels and various other rotating accessories in the chuck. This can be unsafe in some cases, as the chuck arbor, which may be retained in the spindle solely by the friction of a taper fit, may dislodge during operation if the side loads are too high.

  Geared head drill press

  Geared head drill press. Shift levers on the head and a two speed motor control immediately in front of the quill handle select one of eight possible speeds

A geared head drill press is a drill press in which power transmission from the motor to the spindle is achieved solely through spur gearing inside the machine's head. No friction elements (e.g., belts) of any kind are used, which assures a positive drive at all times and minimizes maintenance requirements. Gear head drills are intended for metalworking applications where the drilling forces are higher and the desired speed (RPM) is lower than that used for woodworking.

Levers attached to one side of the head are used to select different gear ratios to change the spindle speed, usually in conjunction with a two- or three-speed motor. Most machines of this type are designed to be operated on three phase power and are generally of more rugged construction than equivalently sized belt-driven units. Virtually all examples have geared racks for adjusting the table and head position on the column.

Geared head drill presses are commonly found in tool rooms and other commercial environments where a heavy duty machine capable of production drilling and quick setup changes is required. In most cases, the spindle is machined to accept Morse taper tooling for greater flexibility. Larger geared head drill presses are frequently fitted with power feed on the quill mechanism, with an arrangement to disengage the feed when a certain drill depth has been achieved or in the event of excessive travel. Some gear-head drill presses have the ability to perform tapping operations without the need for an external tapping attachment. This feature is commonplace on larger gear head drill presses. A clutch mechanism drives the tap into the part under power and then backs it out of the threaded hole once the proper depth is reached. Coolant systems are also common on these machines to prolong tool life under production conditions.

  Radial arm drill press.

  Radial arm drill press

  Radial arm drill press controls

A radial arm drill press is a large geared head drill press in which the head can be moved along an arm that radiates from the machine's column. As it is possible to swing the arm relative to the machine's base, a radial arm drill press is able to operate over a large area without having to reposition the workpiece. This saves considerable time because it is much faster to reposition the drill head than it is to unclamp, move, and then re-clamp the workpiece to the table. The size of work that can be handled may be considerable, as the arm can swing out of the way of the table, allowing an overhead crane or derrick to place a bulky workpiece on the table or base. A vise may be used with a radial arm drill press, but more often the workpiece is secured directly to the table or base, or is held in a fixture. Power spindle feed is nearly universal with these machines and coolant systems are common. Larger size machines often have power feed motors for elevating or moving the arm. The biggest radial arm drill presses are able to drill holes as large as four inches (101.6 millimeters) diameter in solid steel or cast iron. Radial arm drills are specified by the diameter of the column and the length of the arm. The length of the arm is usually the same as the maximum throat distance. The Radial Arm Drill pictured in this article is a 9-inch column x 3-foot arm. The maximum throat distance of this drill would be approximately 36", giving a swing of 72" (6 feet).

  Mill drill

Mill drills are a lighter alternative to a milling machine. They combine a drill press (belt driven) with the X/Y coordinate abilities of the milling machine's table and a locking collet that ensures that the cutting tool will not fall from the spindle when lateral forces are experienced against the bit. Although they are light in construction, they have the advantages of being space-saving and versatile as well as inexpensive, being suitable for light machining that may otherwise not be affordable.

  Unusual uses

  • A household drill was used to save a boy's life in Australia. The boy suffered from potentially fatal bleeding within the brain after a fall from his bike. Having no proper medical tools, the attending doctor decided to use a household drill stored in the hospital maintenance room to remove a clot. This was done in order to relieve the blood pressure in the boy's brain. If this had not been done, the boy would have died in minutes. The doctor performed the procedure and was guided by a neurosurgeon over the phone. The boy was later airlifted to a larger hospital and recovered within days.[5]
  • Paul Gilbert and Billy Sheehan of Mr. Big use a cordless drill for the solo of Daddy, Brother, Lover, Little Boy commonly known as "The Electric Drill Song". This was done by using 3.3mm plectrums on a wooden dowel.
  • The 1970s horror movies The Toolbox Murders and The Wiener depict deranged killers using battery powered drills to kill their victims.
  • Certain variants of Big Daddies in Bioshock use giant arm-mounted drills to perform maintenance tasks and to kill Splicers that attack Little Sisters.

  See also

  References

  1. ^ 1000 Inventions and Discoveries, by Roger Bridgman in association with the Smithsonian Institution.
  2. ^ "Specifications for registration of patent by William Blanch Brain and Arthur James Arnot titled - Improvements in electrical rock drills coal diggers and earth cutters". National Archives of Australia. 1889. http://naa12.naa.gov.au/scripts/ItemDetail.asp?M=0&B=9047342. Retrieved 31 March 2008. 
  3. ^ "C.& E. Fein GmbH company history". Archived from the original on 13 October 2006. http://web.archive.org/web/20061013092244/http://www.fein.de/corp/de/en/company/history.html. Retrieved 7 December 2006. 
  4. ^ US patent 1,245,860, S. D. Black & A. G. Decker, "Electrically driven tool", issued 1917-11-06 
  5. ^ Stewart, Cameron (20 May 2009). "Maryborough GP saves boy Nicholas Rossi with a home drill". The Australian. http://www.theaustralian.news.com.au/story/0,25197,25509892-601,00.html. 

  External links

   
               

 

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