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definición - NATIONAL MINORITY AIDS COUNCIL

definición de NATIONAL MINORITY AIDS COUNCIL (Wikipedia)

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National Minority AIDS Council

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For over twenty years, the National Minority AIDS Council (NMAC) has developed leadership within communities of color to address the challenges of HIV/AIDS since 1987. [1]

It accomplishes this mission through a variety of public policy education programs; national conferences; treatment and research programs and trainings; electronic and printed resource materials; and a website: www.nmac.org. NMAC represents a coalition of 3,000 F/CBOs and AIDS service organizations (ASOs) delivering HIV/AIDS services in communities of color nationwide. NMAC's advocacy efforts are funded through private funders and donors only.

Why There Is a Need for the National Minority AIDS CouncilThe [2] National Minority AIDS Council (NMAC), located in Northwest, Washington, D.C., is the only national organizaton dedicated to raising awareness around HIV/AIDS in communities of color and leveraging local resources to mitigate the diseases impact on minorities.

Its importance in the fight against HIV/AIDS cannot be overstated. Since the first description of AIDS symptoms were published in June 1981, in “Pneumocystis Pneumonia – Los Angeles,” in the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report (MMWR), HIV/AIDS has been closely associated with gay white men. In reality, AIDS has disproportionately affected minorities from the beginning. A nurse named Joan Vileno, of Montifore, a health care facility in the Bronx, New York, recounted in Jane Gross' article, “The State of AIDS, 25 Years After the First, Quiet Mentions; The Nurse”, published in New York Times that the majority of her patients in the early 1980s were minority heterosexual IDUs. Many delayed seeking medical care due to AIDS' close association with homosexuality. All of her patients died, many of them estranged from their families.

This situation laid the foundation for the AIDS epidemic in the United States today. Minorities alone account for over 70% of all HIV/AIDS cases in the United States today. African Americans and Latinos, who each represent 18% of the U.S. population, have been particularly hard hit HIV/AIDS, accounting for over 50% and 18% of all new HIV cases reported to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) each year, respectively. In 2005, the CDC reported that African American adults and adolescents are diagnosed with AIDS at 10 times the rate of whites, and nearly 3 times the rate of Latinos. Minorities account for well over half of the nearly 1 million lives lost to HIV/AIDS in the U.S. since the epidemic began. And among African American women, AIDS is the leading cause of death for those aged 24–35.

These statistics of course raise the question: why are minorities so disproportionately affected by HIV/AIDS? Ethnicity, in itself, is not a risk factor for HIV/AIDS; however, the social, economic, educational and political disenfranchisement experienced by many African Americans nationwide have helped fuel HIV infections in minority communities. To mitigate the epidemic's impact, NMAC leverages the community-based response through a variety of public policy education programs; national conferences; treatment and research programs and trainings; electronic and printed resource materials; and a website: www.nmac.org. NMAC represents a coalition of 3,000 F/CBOs and AIDS service organizations (ASOs) delivering HIV/AIDS services in communities of color nationwide.

Contents

History of the National Minority AIDS Council

Leaders of prominent minority AIDS organization nationwide – including Paul Kawata, Gil Gerard, Calu Lester, Don Edwards, Timm Offutt, Norm Nickens, Craig Harris, Carl Bean, Suki Ports, Marie St.-Cyr and Sandra McDonald – started the National Minority AIDS Council (NMAC) in response to the American Public Health Association (APHA) decision to not invite anyone of color to participate on the panel of its first ever AIDS workshop, at its 1986 association meeting. Harris, an African-American gay man living with AIDS, announced the formation of NMAC during that panel discussion after he rushed the stage, shouting "I WILL BE HEARD" and taking the microphone away from Dr. Merv Silverman, then the San Francisco Health Commissioner.

NMAC then set about to building awareness around the effect of HIV in communities of color. Its first order of business was meeting with US Surgeon General C. Everett Koop while he was writing his historic report about AIDS. Originally scheduled for just 15 minutes, Koop, who had not known about the disproportionate effect of HIV/AIDS among minorities, sat riveted by NMAC's representatives for nearly two and half hours. The report would become the only publication, other than tax and census forms, to be mailed to every person in the United States. The agency incorporated in 1987, and soon launched its groundbreaking social marketing campaign, "Live Long Sugar," with Patti LaBelle, which alerted people of color living with HIV/AIDS about the dangers of the common HIV co-infection, Pneumocystis carnii pneumonia (PNP).

In 1989, NMAC partnered with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) to help build the capacity of small faith- and community-based organizations (F/CBOs) delivering HIV/AIDS services in communities of color. This changed the mission of the agency from raising awareness of the effect of HIV/AIDS among minorities, to building leadership within communities to address the challenges of HIV/AIDS.

Today, NMAC accomplishes this mission through a variety of public policy education programs; national conferences; treatment and research programs and trainings; electronic and printed resource materials; and a website: www.nmac.org. NMAC represents a coalition of 3,000 F/CBOs and AIDS service organizations (ASOs) delivering HIV/AIDS services in communities of color nationwide. NMAC's advocacy efforts are funded through private funders and donors only.

NMAC National Conferences

The agency advances its mission through a variety of programs and services geared to minority faith- and community-based organizations (MF/CBOs), AIDS service organizations and health departments that deliver prevention, care and treatment to people of color living with and/or at risk for HIV/AIDS.

NMAC facilitates two of the most important HIV/AIDS-related conferences in the country:

United States Conference on AIDS (USCA) [3]

Since 1997, USCA has helped increase the strength of the community-based response to AIDS by bringing together thousands of HIV/AIDS professionals from across the country to learn new skills and build partnerships and collaborations. USCA is the largest domestic conference on HIV/AIDS, and features dynamic sessions that enable participants to customize their training experience according to their professional and personal needs.

This is the largest AIDS-related gathering in the United States. Over 3,000 workers representing all fronts of the HIV/AIDS epidemic—from case managers and physicians, to public health workers and advocates, PLWHAs to policymakers—come together to build national support networks, exchange the latest information and learn cutting-edge tools to address the challenges of HIV/AIDS.

HIV Prevention Leadership Summit [4]

Now held every-other-year, HPLS bring together HIV prevention leaders to disseminate and exchange information to enhance HIV prevention program planning and management. The conference provides skills building sessions that highlight effective HIV prevention behavioral interventions, successful collaborations between HIV prevention and care, as well as information sharing on lessons learned.

HPLS brings together staff from community-based organizations, community co-chairs, community planning leaders and health departments to network and learn from each other about HIV prevention efforts including community planning, effective interventions, capacity building and program integration from around the country. This year’s Summit will again include institutes, workshops, roundtables and other sessions geared to planning groups, health departments and community-based organizations providing HIV, viral hepatitis, STD and TB prevention services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) capacity building assistance providers, and other federal and national partner agencies involved in HIV, viral hepatitis, STD and TB prevention.

The goal of the meeting is to bring together leaders in HIV/viral hepatitis/STD/TB prevention – both veteran leaders and new leaders – to disseminate and exchange information and lessons learned, and network to enhance program planning and management. The conference agenda will be developed through an abstract process. This process will help ensure the participation of prevention staff from across the nation. And as a meeting for leaders with all levels of experience, the conference provides opportunities for participants to showcase their jurisdiction or agency’s prevention successes, as well as chances to learn new ideas, meet and network with colleagues from around the country, and build connections that can be brought back to your programs at home.

Technical Assistance Trainings and Capacity Building

NMAC’s Technical Assistance, Training and Treatment Division (TATT) implements the agency’s federally-funded capacity building and technical assistance programs and services to F/CBOs addressing HIV/AIDS in communities of color.

General and Individual Capacity Building Assistance (CBA) [5]The division provides numerous CBA services, and has developed training curricula addressing five critical organizational development areas: grant writing, human resources, strategic planning, fiscal management and board development. CDC-funded F/CBOs may apply to receive free individualized CBA in these five areas, as well as organizational assessment, quality assurance, resource development, program marketing, public relations, policy development, personnel management and information systems/data management.

Prison Initiative [6]TATT’s Prison Initiative increases access to and use of HIV prevention and care resources by people living with HIV/AIDS due to a history of incarceration by fostering and supporting statewide collaborations among stakeholders, such as correction facilities, health departments and F/CBOs. Through the initiative, NMAC supports these networks with comprehensive, consumer-driven capacity building assistance and resources. Ultimately, the Prison Initiative promotes healthier communities by building effective relationships with its stakeholders, while assisting their efforts to create a seamless continuum of care for HIV positive and/or recently released inmates.

Nonprofit Executive Leadership Academy (NELA) NMAC’s premier leadership program, is committed to the leadership development of mid-career non-profit executives managing AIDS service organizations and community- and faith-based organizations that provide HIV prevention services to communities of color. NELA seeks to help non-profit executives overcome their greatest leadership challenges by addressing the core foundations of leadership; the value of strategic visioning and positioning; the need for leadership systems development; and the tools for creating a legacy that will profoundly affect an organization and the community at large.

National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases’ HIV Vaccine Research Education Initiative (NHVREI)As a national NHVREI partner, NMAc helps raise awareness about HIV vaccine research through a variety of activities. These include the creation of a special section of the NMAC website dedicated to providing general HIV vaccine information; links to other national and local NHVREI partners; and an interactive online HIV awareness training tutorial. The site also supports the efforts of HIV Vaccine Awareness Day (HVAD), providing links to other HVAD websites and an online calendar of HVAD events. NMAC oversees an HVAD poster contest, and distributes periodic e-alerts, as well as posts news stories in its media section on the state of HIV vaccine research in the U.S. and abroad.

Advocacy and Public Policy Development

Though its Government Relations and Public Policy Division, NMAC promotes sound national, state and local HIV/AIDS, health and social policies; increases participation of people of color in policy debates and policy-making bodies; and mobilizes local grassroots advocacy efforts to bolster national, state and local policy, support programs and funding targeted to people of color. Its primary programs are:

Women of Color Leadership Institute (WOCLI): [7]Promotes the participation of women of color in the formation of HIV/AIDS policy in the local, state and national arenas by providing them the training and tools they need to become advocates for themselves and their communities.

National Minority HIV/AIDS Policy Partnership (NMAPP): [8]Unites the efforts of NMAC and other national minority organizations in developing the HIV/AIDS public policy skills of social justice leaders, legislators and politicians advocating on behalf of communities of color in the local, state and national arenas. The partnership presents opportunities for NMAC and its partners to extend their advocacy work into new directions, enabling them to better assist the communities of color they represent and support.

NMAC Publications, Media, Online Newswsletters and Website

The Communications Division oversees all media activities for the National Minority AIDS Council, including:

• Production and fulfillment of all NMAC publications, training materials and conference collateral• Management of public relations and news outlet inquiries, including the distribution of press releases and other media• The writing, design and maintenance of NMAC’s e-newsletters, NMAC Lifeline and NMAC in Action, as well as its website (www.nmac.org)• Oversight of the agency’s internal information technology (IT) services and databases

For more information about NMAC’s communications activities, call (202) 234-NMAC (6622) or send an e-mail to communications@nmac.org today.

Equal Access Initiative Computer Grants Program (EAI)

Communications also facilitates the annual Equal Access Initiative Computer Grants Program (EAI), sponsored by the National Institutes of Health (NIH), Office of AIDS Research (OAR). The program provides 100 minority faith- and community-based organizations (F/CBOs)delivering HIV/AIDS services in under-served communities throughout the United States and its territories:• A laptop with cutting-edge software, safety lock and mouse,• A scholarship to attend the “Equal Access Initiative: HIV/AIDS Information Resources from the National Library of Medicine” training at the United States Conference on AIDS

Applications are due annually on February 7: National Black HIV/AIDS Awareness Day.

Help NMAC in the Fight against HIV/AIDS

PLEASE help NMAC continue its important work addressing HIV/AIDS in communities of color.

Organizations – Become a Member Today!Membership has its privileges! In addition to receiving regular updates on NMAC activities, programs and services, members also are given preference for USCA conference scholarships and other awards. Contact NMAC Membership Services to learn more about the benefits of membership at (202) 483-NMAC (6622) or members@nmac.org.

DonationsDonations to NMAC, a 501(c)3, are tax deductible to the full extent of the law. To donate, visit www.nmac.org, or use the tear-off envelope to send a check or money order made out to the “National Minority AIDS Council.” If using a different envelope, the mailing address is:

National Minority AIDS CouncilAttention: Development Division1931 13th Street, NWWashington, DC 20009

You also may want to consider some of the unique giving opportunities NMAC offers:

Memorial Gifts • These donations are made in memory of a lost one to honor his/her accomplishments.

Matching Gifts • Check with your employer’s personnel department to see if your company will match your donation.

Combined Federal Campaign (CFC) and United Way • Federal employees may support the “AIDS Programs of the National Minority AIDS Council” through the CFC, the annual fund-raising drive conducted in Federal and military workplaces, from September 1 to December 15. NMAC’s CFC Designation Code is 10557. Non-federal employees may give to NMAC through United Way, which is designated as #2504.

Additional Information:For more information about supporting NMAC, contact the Development Division at (202) 483-NMAC (6622) or development@nmac.org. Otherwise, visit NMAC online at www.nmac.org.

NMAC Facilities, Staff, and Contact Information

NMAC operates two offices in Washington, DC’s historic U Street corridor. Today, it has 32 full-time staff, and represents over 3,000 community- and faith based organizations nationwide.

National Minority AIDS Council1931 13th Street, NWWashington, DC 20009-4432Telephone: (202) 483-NMAC (6622)Fax: (202) 483-1135E-mail: info@nmac.orgWeb: www.nmac.org

 

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