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alemán árabe búlgaro checo chino coreano croata danés eslovaco esloveno español estonio farsi finlandés francés griego hebreo hindù húngaro indonesio inglés islandés italiano japonés letón lituano malgache neerlandés noruego polaco portugués rumano ruso serbio sueco tailandès turco vietnamita

definición - Suffix

suffix (n.)

1.(linguistics)an affix that is added at the end of the word

suffix (v.)

1.attach a suffix to"suffix words"

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Merriam Webster

SuffixSuf"fix (?), n. [L. suffixus, p. p. of suffigere to fasten on, to affix; sub under + figere to fix: cf. F. suffixe. See Fix.]
1. A letter, letters, syllable, or syllables added or appended to the end of a word or a root to modify the meaning; a postfix.

2. (Math.) A subscript mark, number, or letter. See Subscript, a.

SuffixSuf*fix" (?), v. t. [imp. & p. p. Suffixed (?); p. pr. & vb. n. Suffixing.] To add or annex to the end, as a letter or syllable to a word; to append.

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definición de Suffix (Wikipedia)

sinónimos - Suffix

suffix (n.) (linguistics)

postfix

ver también - Suffix

suffix (v.)

suffixation postfix prefix

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Wikipedia

Suffix

                   

In linguistics, a suffix (also sometimes called a postfix or ending) is an affix which is placed after the stem of a word. Common examples are case endings, which indicate the grammatical case of nouns or adjectives, and verb endings, which form the conjugation of verbs. Particularly in the study of Semitic languages, a suffix is called an afformative, as they can alter the form of the words to which they are fixed. In Indo-European studies, a distinction is made between suffixes and endings (see Proto-Indo-European root). A word-final segment that is somewhere between a free morpheme and a bound morpheme is known as a suffixoid[1] or a semi-suffix[2] (e.g., English -like or German -freundlich 'friendly').

Suffixes can carry grammatical information (inflectional suffixes) or lexical information (derivational suffixes). An inflectional suffix is sometimes called a desinence.[3]

Some examples in European languages:

Girls, where the suffix -s marks the plural.
He makes, where suffix -s marks the third person singular present tense.
It closed, where the suffix -ed marks the past tense.
De beaux jours, where the suffix -x marks the plural.
Elle est passablement jolie, where the suffix -e marks the feminine form of the adjective.

Many synthetic languagesCzech, German, Finnish, Latin, Hungarian, Russian, Turkish, etc.—use a large number of endings.

Suffixes used in English frequently have Greek, French or Latin origins.

Contents

  Inflectional suffixes

Inflection changes grammatical properties of a word within its syntactic category. In the example:

I was hoping the cloth wouldn't fade, but it has faded quite a bit.

the suffix -ed inflects the root-word fade to indicate past tense.

Some inflectional suffixes in present day English:

  Derivational suffixes

In the example:

"The weather forecaster said it would be clear today, but I can't see clearly at all"

the suffix -ly modifies the root-word clear from an adjective into an adverb. Derivation can also form a semantically distinct word within the same syntactic category. In this example:

"The weather forecaster said it would be a clear day today, but I think it's more like clearish!"

the suffix -ish modifies the root-word clear, changing its meaning to "clear, but not very clear".

Some derivational suffixes in present day English:

  See also

  Notes

  1. ^ Kremer, Marion. 1997. Person reference and gender in translation: a contrastive investigation of English and German. Tübingen: Gunter Narr, p. 69, note 11.
  2. ^ Marchand, Hans. 1969. The categories and types of present-day English word-formation: A synchronic-diachronic approach. Munich: Beck, pp. 356 ff.
  3. ^ The Free Online Dictionary
  4. ^ Zwicky, Arnold M.; Pullum, Geoffrey K. (1983), "Cliticization vs. Inflection: English n't", Language (Language, Vol. 59, No. 3) 59 (3): 502–513, doi:10.2307/413900, JSTOR 413900, http://www.stanford.edu/~zwicky/ZPCliticsInfl.pdf 

  External links

   
               

 

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